a silly muse

ask kelly   www.asillymuse.com

twitter.com/sillymuse:

    #homemade #guacamole

    #homemade #guacamole

    — 2 days ago
    #guacamole  #homemade 
    walnut + goat cheese salad with homemade strawberry balsamic vinegar dressing.

    walnut + goat cheese salad with homemade strawberry balsamic vinegar dressing.

    — 5 days ago
    cupcakes are always necessary. (at The Flat)

    cupcakes are always necessary. (at The Flat)

    — 6 days ago with 1 note
    JAWS, the Film that Made Me Fall in Love with Cinema

    I had the chance to see Jaws on the big screen in 35mm form in early 2011. Since then, I’m constantly reflecting on how Jaws and I go way back. I’ve realized that this is the film that started my love obsession with the world of cinema. It went something like this:

    Long ago, there was a time when I was just a youngin’, perhaps around the age of 10. My parents let me watch this film called Jaws. I slipped it into my VHS player and sat on the edge of my bed, facing my little box of a television, fully prepared to watch this movie about a big shark eating people. Two hours later, I had a new perception on life. Perhaps not life itself, but this serious thought overwhelmed me: I ought to appreciate this thing called filmmaking. This felt very severe for my 10 year old self because, after all, I was only 10 and much accustomed to Disney Princess movies. An odd obsession began and I probably watched Jaws weekly and amidst that, refused to swim in the ocean. I remember the VHS copy that my parents bought me had this making-of documentary attached to it so after the film was viewed and the credits rolled (that’s how it worked for VHS, for you people not privy to that sort of video watching), I would continue to watch. I was left memorized by the process of making this film. So it began. I fell in love with film history.

    You could say that I experienced some sort of life fulfillment after this theater experience. Definitely, a part of me feels complete inside. A huge screen, on 35mm, a super stoked audience, that’s how it was meant to be watched, and I can strongly state that I still refuse to swim in the North Atlantic ocean.

    Extra: If you love Jaws (which, you should), here’s a making-of documentary!



    Image via IMDb

    — 1 week ago with 1 note
    sunday dinner.

    sunday dinner.

    — 1 week ago
    beef stew. (at The Flat)

    beef stew. (at The Flat)

    — 1 week ago with 1 note
    #california #sunset #pinkclouds

    #california #sunset #pinkclouds

    — 1 week ago
    #pinkclouds  #sunset  #california 
    champagne + strawberries

    champagne + strawberries

    — 1 week ago
    meal planning. (at TARDIS)

    meal planning. (at TARDIS)

    — 1 week ago
    vegetable overflow.

    vegetable overflow.

    — 1 week ago
    Film Archiving and Obsolete Technology

    As a brief personal history addendum — film archiving and preservation is very dear to me, and I’ve long been researching and studying the practices and theories since my school years.

    Which brings me to my subject of the day. Recently, I came across this article, “When Irreplaceable History Lives on Obsolete Tech" (via AMIA). During grad school, when I was studying film archiving and preservation extensively, a lot of the road blocks I hit were in regards to the assumption that with todays current media (DVDs, Blu-Ray, Hard-Drives, etc.), film archiving wasn’t as necessary since physical film is rarely used these days in favor of digital formats.

    wish this article was written a few years ago. One of the very valid points the writer (John Wenz) stresses upon in this article is, “Disks themselves are, of course, fragile and suffer from inevitable ‘bit rot’ due to magnetic degradation”. More importantly, he addresses the fact that besides the obsolete piece of tech (his example, floppy disks), you need the proper device to access the content, if it’s even salvageable. Then there’s the whole subject of file differences. Files saved on a floppy disk three decades ago, will be in a different format than the JPEG and PNG files we’re accustom to today. Magnetic formats also decay. Nitrate is obsolete now, and who is to say that digital disks won’t be a 100 years from now, or better yet, a 100 years from now, we’ll be using entirely different means of saving data.

    While film becomes obsolete, technology does, too. Who still has a VHS player? Who still can access data placed on a floppy disk? Better yet, who will save it?



    Links: AvSap (Audiovisual Self-Assessment Program), NFPF (National Film Preservation Foundation), Smithsonian Institute Archives.

    Recommended Reading: Nitrate Won’t Wait, Saving Cinema

    — 1 week ago
    Happy Birthday (55!!!) to my stellar dad. A one of the kind soul who will always be my number one hero. Thanks for teaching me that age is just a number, and regardless of how high that number gets, it’s always the bearers attitude that decides how he or she chooses to embrace it.

    Happy Birthday (55!!!) to my stellar dad. A one of the kind soul who will always be my number one hero. Thanks for teaching me that age is just a number, and regardless of how high that number gets, it’s always the bearers attitude that decides how he or she chooses to embrace it.

    — 2 weeks ago
    What I woke up to this morning. #sillyharvey #harveytheminidachshund (at TARDIS)

    What I woke up to this morning. #sillyharvey #harveytheminidachshund (at TARDIS)

    — 2 weeks ago
    #sillyharvey  #harveytheminidachshund 
    penny and @linneabean cuddle session. (at TARDIS)

    penny and @linneabean cuddle session. (at TARDIS)

    — 2 weeks ago with 1 note